Tag Archives: games

Pop Culture Dystopia: Filip Hodas

3D illustrator Filip Hodas has created an ongoing Instagram series exploring a dystopian world of pop-culture icons. Using his incredible talent, Filip has created these eerie images with the help of Cinema 4D, Octane Render, Zbrush, Substance Painter, Substance Designer, World Machine and Adobe Photoshop:

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Lego: Build the Future

Ad agency Ogilvy & Mather (Bangkok) have created wonderful print ads for Lego’s new campaign ‘Build the Future’. No surprise here that they won a Silver Cannes Lions in ‘Print & Publishing’ and ‘Outdoor’ for the campaign. The art direction is absolutely spot on.

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The three careers were chosen as most desirable to children, then CGI studio Illusion (Bangkok) created the pieces using 3D illustration. Locations were strategically selected by Ogilvy for the campaign – the astronaut ad was placed at the planetarium or science museum, the rockstar ad was placed at music schools and the firefighter ad was placed in outdoor playgrounds.

Vice Chairman Nopadol Srikieatikajohn (Ogilvy Thailand) told AdFreak:

Lego’s ultimate purpose is to inspire and develop children to think creatively, reason systematically and release their potential to shape their own future. The brand believes that play is a key element in children’s growth and development. High-quality play enriches a child’s life and lays a strong foundation for adult life.

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California: Designing Freedom | The Design Museum

If you haven’t been to the new building for the Design Museum which recently relocated to Kensington, you are missing out. The architecture and gift shop alone are worth a visit!
The exhibition “California” caught my eye based on the parts that explore ‘freedom’. The exhibition explores more than just the expression of human rights freedom:

California: Designing Freedom explores how the ideals of the 1960s counterculture morphed into the tech culture of Silicon Valley, and how ‘Designed in California’ became a global phenomenon.

The central premise is that California has pioneered tools of personal liberation, from LSD to surfboards and iPhones. This ambitious survey brings together political posters and portable devices, but also looks beyond hardware to explore how user interface designers in the San Francisco Bay Area are shaping some of our most common daily experiences. By turns empowering, addictive and troubling, Californian products have affected our lives to such an extent that in some ways we are all now Californians.

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Aside from the array of Apple inventions and iconic technological advances that California has blessed the world with, the most interesting part of the exhibition for me was “Say What You Want”. Described as “tools of self expression and rebellion”, this part of the exhibition showcased artefacts that were created to highlight racism, sexism and homophobia:

P.S. sorry for the awful photo quality! Taken on my phone.

It was incredible being able to be so close to relics that were created to protest against the biggest human rights movements in the world. They even displayed newspaper articles from the past, and contemporary pieces created against Trump’s America.
I cannot recommend this show enough. It has to be one of my (if not THE) all time favourite exhibitions.

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Nokia 3310 is My Ultimate Nostalgia: Will the New Version Destroy my Childhood Memories?

I’m scrolling through my Twitter feed, I read “the Nokia 3310 is being resurrected” and my first thought is a negative one: “there’s no way they will recreate the original Nokia 3310 in all it’s shit brick glory!” Well, I was right! The first, and most obvious change is that the 2017 ‘version’ has a colour screen, as it runs on Series 30. It also has a 2MP camera phone and a web browser. WTF.
I’m being precious, I’m being judgmental. I can’t help it – 2000 was the beginning of advanced phone technology, and my generation was a part of it. I was given my first phone at the tender age of 11, and spent a lot of my hard earned money on polyphonic ringtones and custom phone cases (Winnie the Pooh and Playboy Bunny being two of my favourites). After I had enough money I soon upgraded to a Motorola flip phone (still on pay-as-you-go, obviously) but secretly still enjoyed playing Snake on my mum’s 3310. Talking of Snake (one of the most iconic games in history) the new 3310 actually features the game, but visually it just doesn’t feel nostalgic for me – as mentioned above, firstly, the screen is in colour so that’s pretty heartbreaking, and secondly it has been replaced by a multi-directional navigation version, rather than the classic up down left and right. We don’t need any more directions!

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The new 3310 was revealed at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on Sunday and was created by new mobile firm HMD Global, which licensed the Nokia brand last year. There are some improvements that might increase its appeal – apart from the new features mentioned above, it has almost halved in weight (so can no longer be referred to as ‘The Brick’ RIP), has a month (standby) battery life, is a third of the price (£42 rather than £129.99), uses a microUSB charge and has a micro SD card slot.
Here’s my problem with the new version of my beloved Brick: the aesthetics (and I presume the actual feel of the phone) are similar like the QWERTY keyboard and removable back, but who will be buying this if it isn’t identical to the original? Upon first hearing about the remake, I assumed the target market would be collectors and nineties kids. People going away on holiday usually don’t have to worry about charges abroad or phone damage because most people have contracts that allow for calls abroad and phone insurance. There’s no WiFi and no range of apps like the essentials Facebook and WhatsApp, so the only people I can imagine this would be suitable for is OAPs who struggle to adapt to technology and want simple call functions.

Penned as the the “detox phone”, I think Nokia’s aim for the the resurrection of the Nokia 3310 is to appeal as a cheap indestructible backup phone, riding on the back of a classic. Honestly, I don’t think people should be saying “The Nokia 3310 is back”, because it simply is not the same. It will be interesting to see how HMD Global market this phone – will they use nostalgia or endurance as their POS?
So, who is it for? You can buy basic phones for under £20 (we bought one for my grandparents) so drug dealers and festival goers won’t care, and it can’t be aimed at hipster techies because it isn’t the same phone…

 

Check out the demonstration by the Telegraph below:

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Spotlight: Michał Kulesza

Graphic designer Michał Kulesza has a range of different work in his portfolio, but the Lego projects he has created certainly stand out. In 2015 Kulesza created a ‘Lego photo project’ by capturing every day objects featuring parts made with Lego, in part 1 ‘Daily Lego Project’. The project started in 2015 and lasted 135 days, capturing a new scenario every day.

I created different grotesque or even absurd daily situations. I took photos in minimal composition and every time I showed new ideas. In my work I just wanted to make people smile.

You can view all the images here, but here are a few of my favourites:

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Part 2 of the project, named ‘Legoman Daily’ features a narrative where Kulesza falls into a box of Lego whilst photographing Part 1 of the project, and subsequently turns into a Legoman himself!

The surprising effect of this crash was that my hands and head were transformed into parts of lego man figure. In this way I created an everyday photo journal after weird accident. How I have to struggle with life challenges and how looks my sad reality. Project was realised as previous, everyday I took just one photo for 106 days.
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I love these projects! Both the concept, the narrative and the output are fantastic, and it certainly made me smile.
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Gender Stereotypes and Children: Stop Gendering Toys!

It’s like something from my childhood imagination! Created by Proximity BCN with production by Post23 for Christmas last year, this ad for Audi Spain goes way beyond a whimsical animation. At first glimpse, one would assume this is an advert for a toy store in Spain.
The animation is an attempt raise awareness regarding gender-specific toys – an important message that plenty of other kids brands have attempted to explore. The campaign was accompanied the hashtag #CambiemosElJuego (“Let’s change the game”) to start a discussion about the topic online.

Eva Santos, Creative Director at Proximity says:

There is a growing trend for brands to communicate what they are all about and how they intend to improve people’s lives.

So, this is an experiment rather than Proximitie’s beliefs?… Weird statement. Anyway, Audi Spain rep Ignacio Gonzalez sums up the idea more eloquently:

“The Doll That Chose to Drive” is the brand’s way of helping to promote a more egalitarian social model … starting with boys and girls, tomorrow’s drivers.

This topic is something I’ve explored a lot (especially at university) – the gendering of children’s toys being limiting, and frankly archaic. Smyths Toy Superstore followed the genderless toys notion, featuring a cartoon boy in princess fancy dress (although the ad is pretty crappy itself):

Smyths were highly praised for the ‘If I Were A Toy’ advert for breaking gender stereotypes, but this wasn’t the first time a kids’ ad had the support of gender-variant consumers – Barbie released a Moschino Barbie (costing $150…. what-the-f!) in 2015, alongside an advert for Mattel featuring an adorable boy. For the first time ever, a boy was been featured in a Barbie commercial:

The list could go on! More and more, I’m seeing both girls and boys sharing their toys and blurring the gender lines in adverts, ignoring gendered products forced upon them by society’s notion of gender. It’s a very bizarre concept considering consumerism and mass-consumption of gendered products are entirely created by social constructs! The strict divide in gender when it comes to children is something adopted by familiarity – they don’t come out wearing gendered clothes, asking for a pretty pink pony.

Here’s an image by one of my favourites, Barbara Kruger, which is think is very apt for this topic:

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AKQA: The Snow Fox

Creative agency AKQA have created this children’s digital storybook for Christmas, transforming the traditional bedtime story of flicking through the pages into a beautifully designed app.

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Inspired by the winter tradition of stories by the fire, The Snow Fox puts the magic of storytelling into the hands of children like never before, giving them the power to bring each page to life in their own personalised story.

Not only is the app’s aesthetic beautiful, the added detail such as personalisation (name and gender of the child) and recordings of the child’s voice for a rendered video at the end is the perfect addition to this digital book.
I love the illustration style and colour palette, which seems to be a rare find in companies and brands who randomly roll out apps and games (not naming any names, Channel4’s ‘Gogglebox’ game, wtf) with little consideration regarding the design.

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CANAL: Kitchen

One of my favourite ads of all time is for CANAL+ (‘The Bear’), which has raised the bar for the ads by BETC Paris for CANAL (they recently merged CANAL+ and CANALSAT).
Whilst their newest spot to celebrate a the revamped network isn’t on par with ‘The Bear’, the idea, execution and visuals are fantastic! As always, BETC Paris has nailed alternative concepts to TV advertising amongst their competitors.

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AI Experiment: Quick, Draw

In collaboration with Google Creative Lab and Data Arts Team, developers Jonas Jongejan, Henry Rowley, Takashi Kawashima, Jongmin Kim, Nick Fox-Gieg built a game built with machine learning:

You draw, and a neural network tries to guess what you’re drawing. Of course, it doesn’t always work. But the more you play with it, the more it will learn. It’s just one example of how you can use machine learning in fun ways.

AI experiment is a website released a few days ago that showcases Google’s artificial intelligence research through web apps that anyone can play with. Projects include a game that guesses what you’re drawing (Quick, Draw), a camera app that recognises objects you and a music app that plays ‘duets’ with you.

Very interesting! Give it a go here. There was only one drawing the machine couldn’t recognise when I tried to draw a stringbean.

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B-Reel: Claw Your Way to the Top

Attention makers, creatives and techies! Agency ‘B-Reel’ has created a digital version of the classic arcade claw machine, complete with RFID-enabled prizes. The objective is to win a job interview, but as the video suggests, it could take place while surfing, a phone-call, getting a massage… the weird list goes on.

Aside from the impressive development and 3D printing – the art direction itself is fantastic. Gradient backgrounds and single-colour 3D objects are really on-trend in the world of design at the moment. Flat design seems to be on its way out.

BReel is a team of storytellers and technologists creating new ways to connect brands and audiences.

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