Tag Archives: ad agency

Anomoly: Dear Satan

Amazing Christmas creatives don’t always come in the form of TV ads. Advertising agencies often create ‘holiday cards’ or animations to send to clients and post on social media. This year, ad agency Anomaly have created a hilarious 2D animation, with a holiday twist called Dear Satan:

The short film is narrated by the legendary Patrick Stewart, and was written, directed, animated and produced by Anomaly. The narrative focuses on what happens when you make a typo in an amusing tale about Satan’s frozen heart feeling compassion for the first time. I won’t ruin the rest of the film!

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The Official Food of Everything: Domino’s | VCCP

As an avid Hollyoaks fan (don’t judge) I see the same adverts at 6.30pm every weekday evening. That means I am subjected to the atrocity that is these Domino’s idents:

Those cheesy (excuse the pun) idents were created by ad agency Iris. Domino’s appointed VCCP as its lead creative and strategic agency for the UK and Ireland in April, but Iris will continue to work on the pizza chain’s digital business.

VCCP’s debut for Domino’s concepts the brand as “The official food of everything” with six TV spots, 2 of which have been aired so far:

Ads are running across radio, digital, social media, Spotify, and DOOH, alongside placements the on dating app Tinder as part of target audience of 16- to 34-year-olds. Users will see a Domino’s-branded profile card and when people swipe right they will be served an offer message to click through to the Domino’s website.

The fully integrated campaign focuses on humorous, real-life situations that narrate how food brings people together:

Forget Sunday roasts, fancy nights out and basic nights in, treat yourself to a Domino’s instead. Whether you’re feeding your squad on the go or having a family night in front of the telly, give the oven the night off and choose a freshly handmade pizza.

I think these ads are a real step up from Iris’s work. Perhaps even the best Domino’s ads (created in the UK) that I can remember! Welldone VCCP!

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Patrons of Pride: Mr President

Ad agency Mr President celebrated pride by creating illustrations to honor 4 iconic LGBT+ icons. Immortalised in the style of stained glass windows, Ellen DeGeneres, George Michael, Nicola Adams, and Laverne Cox were chosen as representatives of love, tolerance and inspiration.

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The agency explained the reason behind the project:

Here at Mr. President we celebrate diversity in all its forms. We don’t care about your gender or sexuality, we think you’re awesome. … Together we talked, laughed, debated and swapped stories before creating our Patrons of Pride campaign honouring four incredible people from the LGBT communities (one from each) – Ellen DeGeneres; George Michael; Nicola Adams and Laverne Cox.

 

It’s nice to see a campaign that has no link to a brand/client or marketing campaign – sometimes it’s difficult to differentiate between genuine support for the LGBT+ community or just a marketing ploy.
The illustrations were displayed on windows overlooking Soho Square for Pride in London on Saturday 8th July:

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First Instagram Ads: Yay or nay?

Ad agency Wieden + Kennedy were commissioned by Instagram to create the new (and first ever) ads for Instagram. The Amsterdam offices created “Stories Are Everywhere,” for the Instagram Stories campaign – Instagram’s first global campaign – with the aim to promote features such as live video, brushes and stickers.

Reflecting how the platform behaves, the campaign’s executions are intended to inspire and excite the audience about the many possibilities available to express themselves. Film content presents small, unexpected moments that are instantly sharable and dynamic outdoor is contextual to the user’s environment. Within the Instagram app, function drivers educate users about the array of features. These executions playfully work together to remind users that Instagram Stories is the place to share life’s highlights and all the casual, everyday moments in between.

The campaign was shot on an iPhone, using just the Instagram app:

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However, the short films showing a juxtaposition of professionally shot footage and “homemade” style footage, does not work for me. They appeared at the Insta Stories Festival in Cologne, Germany last month:

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Praised for celebrating the diversity of expression, they aim to release 20 to 25 films by the end of the campaign, with over 270 billboards and guerrilla OOH, appearing on train stations in Philadelphia and Milan. The concept and the print ads work nicely, but for me the short films above looks like some weird montage. What do you think?

The film compilation is a nay from me! The rest of the campaign – meh. Disappointed as a huge Instagram user and fan.

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Skittles: Give the Rainbow | Disingenuous marketing tactic or LGBT+ ally?

Last year, ad agency adam&eveDDB (represent!) created a campaign for Pride by stripping off their iconic rainbow colour packaging. The “letter” part of the campaign reads:

So this is kind of awkward, but we’re just gonna go ahead and address the rainbow-colored elephant in the room. You have the rainbow … we have the rainbow … and usually that’s just hunky-dory.  But this Pride, only one rainbow deserves to be the centre of attention—yours. And we’re not going to be the ones to steal your rainbow thunder, no siree.

This year, Skittles have brought back the campaign, and it got me questioning the disingenuous nature around using LGBT+ issues for marketing purposes. I’ve blogged about this concern numerous times, and I think it’s important to do one’s research before making any assumptions about a brand’s sincerity. I’m sat at my desk in adam&eveDDB writing this, so putting my bias aside I automatically had negative connotations towards this campaign as many brands use social issues as a marketing ploy. My first thought was “what are they doing to actually support the LGBT community in a physical way? Are they donating? Are they providing support for LGBT youth? Are they supporting families who have lost victims of transphobic violence?”
On a totally creative, marketing, ideas-based note, the campaign idea itself is great – simple, but great. There’s been a weird online backlash claiming that the sweets are racist for promoting “white Pride”. I don’t understand that. The campaign has nothing to do with race.

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Skittles’ aim was to tell Pride that they didn’t want to steal their “rainbow thunder”, but some have said that using the the LGBT rainbow connotations as a campaign is doing exactly that. With these LGBT issues so close to my heart, it’s hard to see past the fact that Skittles (Wrigley UK) are just doing their job – creating a marketing strategy to boost sales and awareness of the brand.
However, the positive side of me wants to say that all publicity is good publicity – if a brand is openly supporting their LGBT employees and consumers, that can’t hurt! In reference to my earlier point regarding actions speaking louder than words, I discovered that for Pride 2017 the limited edition rainbow-less Skittles packets are in association with Tesco, who are donating 2p per packet to Tesco’s LGBT+ charity partners. Skittles aim is to show their support again for Pride, and to celebrate diversity and inclusion. I’m glad this statement is backed up by an actual charitable donation rather than jumping on the back of a very important celebration of human rights.

To conclude, Skittles absolutely are LGBT+ allies, and I’m so happy to see that Tesco are too!

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Lysol: Protect Like a Mother

Mother’s Day in the US is imminent, so ad agency McCann (New York) and cleaning products company Lysol teamed up for the campaign “What It Takes To Protect”. Lysol is probably the US equivalent to the UK’s cleaning brand ‘Dettol’, and instead of marketing their anti-bacterial products like most competitors do, globally, they adopted a more emotional and sensitive take on protecting against germs.
The adorable narrative celebrates the protective strength of parents, with Lysol there to help them, focusing on the universal human instinct to keep your loved ones safe. Using metaphors for protection against germs, we see animal mothers protecting their human children against rain, bullies and accidents.

The campaign expands beyond TV and digital, as Lysol will host an experience in Brooklyn Bridge Park called “Protect like a mother: an exhibit presented by Lysol” over the US Mothers Day weekend (14th May). It aims to highlight the most fierce protectors in the animal kingdom: mothers, and will include large scale animal installations that children can interact with.

I think it’s a fantastic concept! So much more effective and memorable than the cringey cleaning ads we’re used to.

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#FreeTheFeed: Mother London

Ad Agency Mother created a Mother’s Day project for the UK’s holiday (Sunday 26th March), to make a statement against the judgement placed upon mothers who breast feed in public:

A celebration of every woman’s right to decide how and where they feed their children without feeling guilty or embarrassed about their parenting choices.

So, Mother created a giant inflatable breast and placed it on top of a building in Shoreditch on Sunday. The very detailed and very large breast boldly designed by the creative team aims to spark conversation about the attitudes towards the most natural form of feeding. Alongside the outdoor installation, Mother created a series of posters displaying the hashtag “#FreeTheFeed” and the reasons behind the project.

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I’ve always found it bizarre how people are happy to drink milk from a cow, but heaven forbid another human! This is a fantastic in-your-face, no-f*cks-given approach to a campaign, showing that social design is what we need to ignite conversations about outdated stigmas.

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Grey becomes Valenstein & Fatt

In 1917 anti-semitism was rife – having a Jewish name would do you no favours in a predominantly white, male industry like advertising. In New York, Jewish entrepreneurs Lawrence Valenstein and Arthur Fatt, set up a company called ‘Grey’ which is now one of the largest advertising networks in the world. However, they didn’t name the agency after themselves like others did, and it’s been debated whether or not Grey would have been as successful with the name ‘Valenstein & Fatt’. As sad and unfair as this seems, xenophobia was the norm, and many Jewish people around the world hid their surnames in an attempt to “fit in” with society, along with other minorities who have done the same.

Unfortunately, it seems as if this attitude towards cultural, religious and racial differences has in fact not evolved as much as you’d expect over the last 100 years – the recent election of the US President is a prime example of how common xenophobia still is, worldwide:

Fast forward to 2017: Everything has changed, and yet nothing has changed.
Too much in this world is still ugly. We know that the more diverse we are, the more powerful our ideas will be. So we will continue to celebrate difference. To break down barriers to progress and opportunity. We believe that everyone has the right to put their name above their door. Whoever you are, wherever you come from. We are Open.

Along with a prejudiced President in the USA, here in the UK ‘Article 50’ is being triggered this week, creating a final divide between the UK and Europe. With these events in mind, Grey is communicating a message of diversity and inclusion by recognising their Jewish founders, whilst hoping to create a conversation about diversity in advertising.
Unfortunately the name change will only be for 100 days, which is a shame, and almost makes this campaign seem like a bit of a gimmick… Although they claim the name change is “a mark of how far we’ve come, but how much there is still left to do”, I can’t help but feel as if it’s just a marketing ploy without any actual lasting impact or strong, dedicated message if they’re just going to change the name back.

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Valenstein & Fatt have written a manifesto about how they will lead by example:

1) We are publishing our diversity data. Progress cannot be made without clear measures and transparency about who we are today. Our new study is independent and in depth and is based on the voluntary responses of 305 individuals, which represents over 60% of the agency and reported according to standards set by the British Office of National Statistics (ONS). Research developed in partnership with PSB examines roots, identity, education and lifestyle. It will be measured and shared annually and we are encouraging other agencies to take it up as their methodology.

2) We are launching a cross industry taskforce to identify the barriers to recruitment and retention of talent among ethnic minorities. The first gathering will be chaired by CEO Leo Rayman, and we are inviting leading organisations in this space and the most progressive agencies, including Chairwoman of Mediacom, Karen Blackett, to join us in agreeing industry-wide initiatives and targets. We will also commit to targets for our advertising output, to ensure that it is nationally representative. 

3) We are launching the Valenstein & Fatt Bursary to pay a year’s rent for up to two young people from ethnic minority and disadvantaged backgrounds. To qualify, candidates must have been offered a job at Grey, be state educated and live outside of Greater London. Applications are open from this summer.

4) We will inspire the next generation, by working with 100 primary and secondary schools to introduce students to a career in the creative industries. Working with Exec Head Michelle Williams and education therapist Jodie Cariss and starting with the New Wave Federation primary schools in London’s Hackney, we will offer a tailor made programme for the schools involved, from assemblies to full day workshops, coaching and agency open days.

5) We will develop our diverse talent. Recognising that recruiting people with different start points isn’t enough, 50 individuals identified as ones to watch will be matched and formally mentored by our Executive and senior leadership. In parallel we will run Community mentoring workshops open to any member of the agency who wants to participate.

That’s all fantastic, and it’s lovely to see such an influential agency speak out against prejudice, but I don’t believe they should have done this without 100% committing to a permanent name change. What’s the point otherwise?

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Guinness (St Patrick’s Day): Iris & mcbess

St Patrick’s Day (Friday March 17th) is just around the corner, so ad agency Iris have teamed up with esteemed artist and illustrator mcbess to create a series of illustrations for their client Guinness.

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Featuring the line “Let’s Get Together”, mcbess has created characters enjoying the iconic drink, surrounded by numerous recognisable previous brand references such as the toucan (below), surfers and ‘sapeurs’ (AMV BBDO).

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Although mcbess is a hugely talented artist, and a favourite of mine, I can’t see past the TfL ads which have dominated the London Underground and therefore remained associated to TfL in my mind:

However, it’s certainly proved beneficial for mcbess that his work is instantly recognisable, due to the monochrome and complicated personal style, which has caught the attention of other brads like Nike, Converse and Jack Daniels.

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Candid Conversations: Being Black in Advertising

Advertising agency TBWA launched a cultural editorial series called ‘Backslash’ last year, curated by 200 creators from across the global network. TBWA describes Backslash as “your daily edit of cultural trends”, and all of their employees receive a daily two-minute video about a range of topics, e.g. VR in medicine and science, social media’s responsibility of their users’ mental health, drone taxis, kids and technology… the list is lengthy and diverse. The project was created with just an Instagram account and internal content for employees, but TBWA believe that the team has expanded so quickly that they are hoping to create more publicly distributed content in the future, like the one above.

Richard Stainer, chief executive of TBWA\London said:

Creating at the speed of culture requires a deep knowledge of culture, and this is what Backslash gives us. It turns TBWA into a global knowledge and creativity network.

Diversity in advertising has been an enormous topic of discussion recently, and many agencies have explored this dialogue through different projects. TBWA’s Backslash looks at black professionals working in the ad industry in the short film above, featuring employees from the Omnicom network.

Nick Barham, TBWA Worldwide chief strategy officer said:

We felt that, for Black History Month, it was important to think about African American culture as it relates to advertising. I don’t think change is happening as quickly as it should. We want to represent what people are listening to, what they’re interested in and what brands care about.

As someone who is very switched on and actively interested in diversity in all aspects of life, I surprised myself with how little I had considered the lack of black creatives in advertising. The conversations in this short film about diversity are absolutely evident and relevant. Hopefully those who had never considered the lack of black talent in advertising think differently about the way agencies embrace inclusion.
It’s important that agencies consider and discuss diversity in the workplace, rather than those who feel like the minority discussing amongst themselves. Creating content for purposes other than client projects is a great way to start a conversation about race, as it becomes more human and less like a storyline created to jump on the equality bandwagon.

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