Category Archives: social media

Anomoly: Dear Satan

Amazing Christmas creatives don’t always come in the form of TV ads. Advertising agencies often create ‘holiday cards’ or animations to send to clients and post on social media. This year, ad agency Anomaly have created a hilarious 2D animation, with a holiday twist called Dear Satan:

The short film is narrated by the legendary Patrick Stewart, and was written, directed, animated and produced by Anomaly. The narrative focuses on what happens when you make a typo in an amusing tale about Satan’s frozen heart feeling compassion for the first time. I won’t ruin the rest of the film!

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Christmas Adverts 2017: Who is my number 1?

Well well well, this year is almost over and what better way for any creative to finish the year then to look forward to the competitive Christmas ads. Unfortunately though, this year I was thoroughly disappointed! John Lewis? Meh; Aldi, cute but the same as last year; Very, cute I guess; Debenhams, errr I didn’t get the hype; Very… cute I guess.

I had big expectations for John Lewis this year – I absolutely adored last year’s trampoline ad, but this year’s monster ad felt like a washed down version of the same vibe. I don’t know, it just didn’t do it for me. There wasn’t the same creative spark and humour.

There’s one ad that stands out from the rest by far, and that’s ASDA! Ad agency Saatchi & Saatchi created a Willy Wonka cross Wes Anderson style advert for ASDA called “Best Christmas Ever”. The ad depicts a magical tour around The Imaginarium where all of ASDA’s Christmas treats are created:

Sara Rose, CD at Saatchi & Saatchi (London) said:

Although the campaign has a fantastical element to it, our stories are firmly rooted in what Asda has to offer shoppers this Christmas, from old favourites to inventive new treats like gin infused chocolates and massive Christmas puddings. Our first thought was ‘how do they come up with these things?’ And the campaign just grew from there.
Earlier in the year we held sessions with our customers to get feedback on our Christmas range. As we talked to them about Christmas we could see how much joy and happiness planning their Christmas brought them—we knew we wanted to reflect that in our ad.

ASDA has gone full force on this campaign with the use of social by creating a Snapchat filter that turns users into the ad’s moustached weightlifters. Also, 2-second content and carousel ads feature on Facebook, and the use of Trueview videos for the first time. Trueview will connect audience search terms to relevant video content online via YouTube and Facebook.
The 60 second TV ad will be supported by 30 segments (focusing on gifting, home decorations, parties and gatherings, and “the big shop”) as well as :10s and :06 bumpers on YouTube. AND all of that will be joined by cinema, radio, print, digital OOH. And breathe.

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Chris Hughes for Mental Health Awareness: Top man | CALM

Yesterday, Love Island’s Chris Hughes released a bizarre video campaign for a collaboration with Topman called “L’eau de Chris”. The video posted on Instagram received a lot of criticism, labelling Chris a joke and a narcissist for selling the drink for £2. The post saw the 24-year-old star posing in his underwear with “Mineral water infused with a Chris Hughes tears”.

 

As an avid Love Island viewer (no shame here) I assumed that the ad was a parody and a p*ss-take – Chris is known for his dead-pan humour and providing many giggles to millions of viewers this summer. To my surprise the campaign was in fact real, but not for a self-absorbed product to build his brand. Chris has teamed up with mental health charity CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably) to raise awareness about male mental health and the male suicide epidemic.

CALM launched the #Don’tBottleItUp campaign to urge men not to internalise their emotions after it was found in a poll for YouGov that 84% of UK men say they bottle up their emotions. Chris collaborated with world famous photographer RANKIN for this project.

L’eau de Chris? What’s really ludicrous is that suicide is still the single biggest killer of young men in the UK. We live in a culture that encourages men to “man up” and bottle things up. That’s why I’ve become an Ambassador for CALM and why together with TOPMAN we want to show men across the UK that it’s okay to open up instead of bottling it up.

Hughes is now proudly an ambassador for CALM, and broke down in tears at an event yesterday whilst explaining his own struggles with mental health. Whilst on Love Island, Chris was praised for being very open with his feelings, something which men and boys struggle with immensely. Whoever chose Chris as ambassador certainly hit the nail on the head when it comes to targeting young people, as his name is everywhere in the world of gossip and celebrity since stealing our hearts on ITV2.
The limited edition promotional run of L’Eau de Chris water bottles (yes they are real) created for Chris’s campaign launch will now be auctioned here, with all proceeds going to support the charity. Also, Topman will donate £2 from every pack of Topman boxers sold from 10th – 31st October to CALM, in support of the #DontBottleItUp campaign.

 

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The Official Food of Everything: Domino’s | VCCP

As an avid Hollyoaks fan (don’t judge) I see the same adverts at 6.30pm every weekday evening. That means I am subjected to the atrocity that is these Domino’s idents:

Those cheesy (excuse the pun) idents were created by ad agency Iris. Domino’s appointed VCCP as its lead creative and strategic agency for the UK and Ireland in April, but Iris will continue to work on the pizza chain’s digital business.

VCCP’s debut for Domino’s concepts the brand as “The official food of everything” with six TV spots, 2 of which have been aired so far:

Ads are running across radio, digital, social media, Spotify, and DOOH, alongside placements the on dating app Tinder as part of target audience of 16- to 34-year-olds. Users will see a Domino’s-branded profile card and when people swipe right they will be served an offer message to click through to the Domino’s website.

The fully integrated campaign focuses on humorous, real-life situations that narrate how food brings people together:

Forget Sunday roasts, fancy nights out and basic nights in, treat yourself to a Domino’s instead. Whether you’re feeding your squad on the go or having a family night in front of the telly, give the oven the night off and choose a freshly handmade pizza.

I think these ads are a real step up from Iris’s work. Perhaps even the best Domino’s ads (created in the UK) that I can remember! Welldone VCCP!

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Trans* Ban: Not a Burden

There seems to be running theme with the illustrations I am creating. It’s impossible to ignore the garbage that comes out of Donald Trump’s mouth, and it’s certainly impossible to ignore messages of hate, including transphobia.
In August, Trump’s directive issued a military policy that would prohibit transgender people from joining all branches of the armed forces and ban military healthcare plans from funding sex-reassignment surgeries. Trump has decided to discredit American heroes based on their gender identity by directing the military not to move forward with an Obama-era plan (from 2016). The plan allowed transgender individuals to be recruited into the armed forces, along with a ban of the Department of Defense from using its resources to provide medical treatment mentioned above.

Once more, many trans* heroes will be left in limbo in so many different ways – mentally, socially, financially and emotionally. Trump’s decision pours salt an already transphobic wound that a large part of the world is desperately trying to heal.
This illustration questions what exactly is the difference between a cis-soldier and a trans-soldier? Nothing.

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You are streaming consciousness: Three

Creative company Gravity Road were commissioned by Three to create an ad for their campaign “Go Binge”, which explored findings from an extensive consumer research survey around the bingeing behaviours of the UK (The Binge Files). 44% of people aged 16-24 years old watch more than an hour of streamed content on their phones daily and 46% binge because they can’t wait for the next episode. With these facts, Gravity Road created a (hilarious) short film parodying people’s streaming addictions, and despite the research insights this binging culture is constantly being discussed on social media and in memes.

Three’s deal allows binge-obsessed customers to stream films, TV shows and music on popular streaming services (e.g. Netflix, TV Player, Deezer and SoundCloud) without the fear of exceeding their data limit. Directed by the multi-award winning director Tom Geens, the short film is set in an eccentric electronics store, where the store owner hosts secret ‘Binge classes’ after hours. The owner encourages people to become more in-tune with streaming and love their devices, to help them achieve a higher stream of consciousness through activities like chanting “Stream in, and stream out, I love my device, the device is me…”. Hilarious. This is definitely one of the best UK ads I’ve seen this year.

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TrueView: Date Series

Creative agency Feed Me Light have teamed up with dating app TrueView for a quirky animation. FML created a series of animated shorts for the new dating service based on the sad fact that dating apps make finding love far less romantic and far more scary:

Labeled the ‘Undateable Suspects’, the series was developed based on a set of characters that had been created from real research on the dangerous individuals you encounter whilst looking for love online. FML’s 3D artist Remy Dupont brought these characters to life, including the likes of Billy Bad Chat, Six Pack Stu, Two Faced Tony and Dirty Pics Derrick:

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ASA Will Introduce Guidelines for 2018 on Gender Stereotyping in Advertising

The Advertising Standards Authority has reviewed its approach to ads that feature stereotypical gender roles, following the publication of an investigation into gender stereotyping in advertising; the Depictions, Perceptions and Harm report. The report claims that gender stereotyping in advertising causes harm towards individuals, the economy and society.

In 2015, the infamous “Beach Body Ready” advert sparked concerns for the sexualisation and objectification of women in advertising, creating a conversation with ASA about how women are portrayed as desirable based on their bodies:

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ASA conducted a review following the complaints, but now the regulators are receiving complaints about ads that feature sexist stereotypes or mock people who don’t follow traditional roles. The new standards are only guidelines and are not intended to ban all forms of gender stereotypes, e.g. there will not be a ban on ads showing a woman cleaning or a man doing DIY tasks. However, subject to context and content considerations, the evidence suggests the following types of depictions are likely to be problematic:

  • An ad which depicts family members creating a mess while a woman has sole responsibility for cleaning it up
  • An ad that suggests a specific activity is inappropriate for boys because it is stereotypically associated with girls, or vice-versa
  • An ad that features a man trying and failing to undertake simple parental or household tasks

“CAP will report publically on its progress before the end of 2017 and commits, as always, to delivering training and advice on the new standards in good time before they come into force in 2018.”
So, the ‘guidelines’ suggest that agencies, brands and companies should consider whether the stereotypes shown in their campaigns would “reinforce assumptions that adversely limit how people see themselves and how others see them”. Here is a list of what should be avoided:

  • Roles: Occupations or positions usually associated with a specific gender.
  • Characteristics: Attributes or behaviours associated with a specific gender.
  • Mocking people for not conforming to stereotype: Making fun of someone for behaving or looking in a non-stereotypical way.
  • Sexualisation: Portraying individuals in a highly sexualised manner.
  • Objectification: Depicting someone in a way that focuses on their body or body parts.
  • Body Image: Depicting an unhealthy body image.

Ads suggesting specific activities were suitable only for boys or girls are problematic and something ASA advises against. This is a topic I investigated at university for my gender project and for my dissertation exploring masculinity in modern advertising. It’s quite incredible (and worrying) to to dissect the vast range of gendered stereotypes advertising still depicts. There is an enormous list of adverts that have been criticised for depicting masculinity and femininity stereotypically, and here are just a few examples:

Aptamil depicting gendered roles for boys and girls

KFC suggesting anxiety/mental health isn’t manly (the ad has been taken down – sorry for the poor quality!)

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GAP portraying only boys as academics

Whilst a lot of people will claim that these guidelines are “over-sensitive” and “PC”,  the mocking of women and men and the reinforcement of stereotyped views of gender roles are issues that have gained considerable public interest, with the facts to support the claims:

The move follows a major research project from JWT (New York) and The Geena Davies Institute in the Media which analysed 2,000 ads and found that women in advertising are “humourless, mute and in the kitchen’. According to the research, women are 48% more likely to be shown in the kitchen.

JWT’s recent Women’s Index surveyed 9,000 women and found that 85% of them felt advertising and film needed to “catch up with the real world”. Additionally, since concerns were raised about gender portrayal in advertising, brands have taken a conscious decision to change the way men and women are depicted. Unilever recently teamed up with Mars, Facebook, and WPP to form the Unstereotype Alliance – a group dedicated to purging gender bias from ads – followed by an ‘Unstereotype’ pledge. Following this, they created Dove and Lynx ads which aimed to smash traditional gender roles, and consequently saw a 24% increase in consumer ratings.
Lynx ‘Find Your Magic’ is actually one of my favourite male brand ads:

In a time where we need feminism, diverse masculinity and gender diversity more than ever, I think this is a wonderful idea. The fact that they are guidelines rather than rules also helps show people that based off research, this sets a standard that we should all (not just creatives) adhere to when it comes to gender. Sort of like a moral code.
It’s hard to believe that 40+ years after the Sex Discrimination Act we are still seeing gender discrimination on our screens.
Often, I wonder if people are becoming desensitized to feminism because a large majority of people actually believe that women have equal rights just because we won the right to vote or can become a CEO. When it reality, we are far from gender equality – salaries aren’t the same, women and discriminated against and girls are still sexualised.

So if you think this is “over-sensitive”, you need to EDUCATE YO’SELF!

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First Instagram Ads: Yay or nay?

Ad agency Wieden + Kennedy were commissioned by Instagram to create the new (and first ever) ads for Instagram. The Amsterdam offices created “Stories Are Everywhere,” for the Instagram Stories campaign – Instagram’s first global campaign – with the aim to promote features such as live video, brushes and stickers.

Reflecting how the platform behaves, the campaign’s executions are intended to inspire and excite the audience about the many possibilities available to express themselves. Film content presents small, unexpected moments that are instantly sharable and dynamic outdoor is contextual to the user’s environment. Within the Instagram app, function drivers educate users about the array of features. These executions playfully work together to remind users that Instagram Stories is the place to share life’s highlights and all the casual, everyday moments in between.

The campaign was shot on an iPhone, using just the Instagram app:

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However, the short films showing a juxtaposition of professionally shot footage and “homemade” style footage, does not work for me. They appeared at the Insta Stories Festival in Cologne, Germany last month:

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Praised for celebrating the diversity of expression, they aim to release 20 to 25 films by the end of the campaign, with over 270 billboards and guerrilla OOH, appearing on train stations in Philadelphia and Milan. The concept and the print ads work nicely, but for me the short films above looks like some weird montage. What do you think?

The film compilation is a nay from me! The rest of the campaign – meh. Disappointed as a huge Instagram user and fan.

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Pride in London: Love Happens Here | WCRS

WCRS were commissioned by Pride in London to create a campaign for Pride 2017, whilst also marking 50 years since the legalisation of homosexuality in the UK. The campaign has been huge, featuring TV ads for Pride for the first time ever. In fact, the campaign has been split into two narratives – love and hate – to portray both ends of the spectrum for the LGBT+ community.

Hate
The first part of the multimedia campaign explored hate crime, emotionally and physically, including posters, Wi-Fi takeover, an event, London taxi skins and a film:

Additionally, an advert directed by Fred Scott will appear exclusively on Channel 4 during a special season of programming, followed by four films. The emotional advert (below) ‘The Apology’, features apologies from those who have lost relationships with love ones after judging and not accepting their sexuality:

 

Love
The second part of the multimedia campaign, released today, will include digital OOH sites portraying real life love stories from members of the LGBT+ community, illustrated by 30 different artists and illustrators. Illustrators have created the works for free, using the branded heart ‘pin’ icon, which will be available at the Tate as part of their Queer Britain season.
Here’s a few of my favourite illustrations:

Love stories are available on Pride’s interactive love map:

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The ‘Love’ aspect of the campaign aims to show that love happens in London despite the sad reality of the ‘Hate’ part. Ross Neil, ECD at WCRS said:

This is a campaign that started from a negative place of hatred and has blossomed into a full technicolour, full volume, inclusive expression of love. The greatness of the creative is matched only by the sheer scale of companies and individuals.

The campaign doesn’t stop there – Pride are encouraging Londoners to create their own pins and share their love stories on social media. It’s a fantastic campaign, and whilst I’m not the biggest fan of the original heart pin design itself, the multi faceted narrative this campaign has explored is wonderful.

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