Monthly Archives: September 2016

Girls of Paradise: McCann Paris

With every positive there’s a negative, and this is definitely true when it comes to the pros and cons of the internet. The internet allows us to feel like we have some sort of faceless anonymity, and McCann Paris (for French organisation Le Mouvement du Nid) explored this idea with ‘Girls of Paradise’ – a fake (but very convincing) escort website that is aimed at consumers of this industry to highlight their responsibility and association with violence against women in the escort business.

As mentioned above, it is easy to become inconspicuous and innominate on the internet, particularly when dealing with something as seedy and taboo as the sex industry. On the website, one can view profiles and photos, and chat or call the women before arranging a date. The key unveiling of this project is when the ‘Girls’ are presented as already dead – this is revealed when the customer tries to converse with the escort, and is instead shown gruesome photos of the women beaten and bloody, on their death-beds. Additionally, the active customer may be told that the chosen girl is unavailable due to being assaulted or murdered (in horrific and specific detail) by a previous customer. What better way to communicate a horrendous, but urgent message than shove the evidence right in the consumer’s (accomplice’s) face?! This is why I love advertising for social change.

Amazingly, 600+ calls were taken in the first week on Girls of Paradise, and Le Mouvement du Nid (whose aim is to help women victimised by the sex trade) believes the campaign was highly influential in France’s law changes. On 6th April 2016, France made paying for sex illegal.
[McCann Paris/Le Mouvement du Nid won gold at the Clio Awards.]

 

Company: McCann Paris
Agency Network: McCann Worldgroup
Production Company: Medialab Technology, Paris
Creative Agency: McCann Paris, Clichy
Executive Creative Director: Riccardo Fregoso
Executive Creative Director: Julien Chiapolini
Art Director: Christophe Rambaux
Copywriter: Gilles Ollier
CEO: Bruno Tallent
Account Coordinator: Coline Déchelette
Worldwide Account Director: Fiona Ferrier-Weil
Digital Account Manager: Selim Boukhanef
Strategic Planner: Shadi Razavi
Art Buyer: Véronique Leblanc
Art Buyer: Delphine Devaux
Producer: Isabelle Créchet
Producer: Caroline de Génis
Chief technology officer: Dragan Kontic
Technical Project Manager: Vianney de Villier
Technical Project Manager: Clément Hardouin
Front End Developer: Pierre-Yves Chassaigne
Managing Director: Agnieszka Kozbial
Sound Producer: Capitaine Plouf

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Advertising and the rise of Trans* awareness

Whilst it’s perhaps not ideal as a Londoner to be writing about gender identity statistics in the US, it is still important note that the number of trans-identifying adults in the United States has doubled in the last decade (now 1.4 million adults). It’s a shame that publicised trans* awareness doesn’t seem to have the same impact in the UK… no major Government or administrative surveys have collected data by including a question where trans people can choose to identify themselves. Publicly collected data on trans people is virtually non-existent! Understandably though, there is a larger base of A-list celebrities in the USA, including trans* celebs like Caitlyn Jenner (below) and Laverne Cox (Orange is the New Black).

So, for now, the focus of this blog post will be about the impact of trans* awareness through advertising and marketing in the USA…

In August, Nike aired an ad for the Olympics featuring triathlete Chris Mosier (the first transgender athlete to make a U.S. men’s national team) which had millions of people from the entertainment, creative and advertising industries taking note. Since then, brands like H&M (featuring Caitlyn Jenner), YouTube and Bud Light, have either featured trans* stories/trans*-inclusive messaging in recent campaigns.

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Days after Nike’s 30-second spot, Clairol (Procter & Gamble) announced that trans* model Tracey Norman (who had worked for them previously in the 70s), would become the face of the Nice ‘n Easy ads once more. Grey (New York) were behind Clairol’s ad, and Beth Avellini (global group CD) states that “Advertising reflects society as a whole, and there’s been a slow acceptance that’s been happening in society.” I couldn’t agree more! However, there’s always a fear that marketers and creatives will use “the token trans* person” for buying power (which has also been expressed in the LGBT community as a whole), and the rise of trans*-inclusive publicity has brought into question whether these campaigns are for social benefit or brand benefit.

I have to say, the ads mentioned above do have a true sense of authenticity and passion. However, as a cis-gender woman I struggle to allow myself to actually have a strong opinion on this topic because it would never and could never affect me directly. It’s difficult to have 100% belief of genuine intentions when it comes to ads being created by hetero-normative marketers in a hetero-normative society. I have to agree with Chris Edwards (copywriter and author of the memoir, ‘Balls: It Takes Some to Get Some’) who states that “terminology is evolving… it is important for advertisers to do their research and work with advisors to make sure copy and tone resonate with the intended audience.”

 

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BBC Neurodiversity: magneticNorth

MagneticNorth has created an identity for a new BBC project to help people with neurological conditions (such as Tourette’s, dyslexia and autism) in the workplace.

The logo and the brand’s font is simple and clean, reflecting research that claims that people on the autistic spectrum can find complex patterns unpleasant and distracting. Likewise, the colour palette for the brand was intended to feel calming and accessible for all, yet bold enough to stand out amongst other campaigns.” (src: magneticNorth).

cape-1

CAPE, an acronym from “creating a positive environment” was developed by the BBC. Only 15% of working age people with neurodiverse conditions are in employment, and this longterm project aims to promote the notion that they “have unique talents and skills that are not currently being harnessed affectively in the workplace.”

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The branding is currently featured on print posters, digital screens, leaflets and event branding.

As someone with a huge interest in social design, projects like CAPE reinforce why I love my industry. Designers (and general creatives) have the ability, and opportunity, to communicate and educate using their talent, for the greater good. What an incredibly special skill to have!

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Adobe’s New Clothing Line: Stock Photos

This is a hilarious campaign about Adobe Stock, featuring stock imagery that’s polar-opposite to the cheesy crap featured on these garments. Adobe Stock Apparel was created by Swedish ad agency Abby Priest aiming to give “… a salute to the most infamous stock images creatives love to hate.”

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I have to say, this is all too relatable. I’ve spent a considerable amount of time on certain projects throughout my career sifting through the horrendous stock imagery for hours and hours… Whilst it is a definite test of patience, it is also weirdly great entertainment. I even recognise the old couple on the featured image above! Those guys.

There’s even a Look Book.

 

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